Kenward, Linda, Charlotte Whiffin, & Michael Townend (2021, September). The needs of clients coming to counselling following second harm: A Q methodology study. Counselling & Psychotherapy Research. (ePub in advance of print) (Link: https://doi.org/10.1002/capr.12475)

Abstract: Second harm is the added psychological distress from an inadequate response by healthcare providers in response to medical errors or neglect. This inadequate response may require patients to seek counselling. The counselling needs of patients who have experienced second harm have received limited research attention. This Q methodology study addresses this gap in knowledge in order to further inform counselling practice. Participants sorted 42 pre‐determined statements online followed by interviews to establish the rationale for the sorting pattern choices. Data from the online sort were analysed using factor analysis to establish the viewpoints expressed. The interview data added to the interpretation of the viewpoints. Through a factor analysis, two ‘viewpoints’ and 11 counselling needs were identified. Nine of these needs were generic to the counselling relationship and two specific to second harm. This study concluded that people seeking counselling following second harm have needs beyond those expected from a general counselling relationship. These included not being blamed for what happened and a need for the counsellor to be able to demonstrate that they are able to understand the impact of harm. The needs identified in this study as being generic can give counsellors confidence in working with clients that have experienced second harm, knowing that many of the needs identified are not unique. Counsellors can also be confident that those needs that are unique can be understood through extending their knowledge of the topic and listening to those that have been harmed.

Linda Kenward <caledonialk@gmail.com> is in Nursing, University of Cumbria, Carlisle, UK.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.