Douglas, Catherine, Lisa Wood, & Danny Taggart (2021, February). Recovery priorities of people with psychosis in acute mental health in-patient settings: A Q-methodology study. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy. 14 pp. (ePub in advance of print) (doi: 10.1017/S1352465820000892) (Link: https://doi.org/10.1017/S1352465820000892)

Abstract: Background: Personal recovery from psychosis has been explored extensively in community samples but there has been little exploration with people currently receiving care from an acute mental health in-patient setting. Aims: The aim of this study was to explore the personal recovery priorities of people experiencing psychosis who are currently receiving care from an acute mental health in-patient ward. Method: A Q-methodology mixed-methods approach was adopted. Thirty-eight participants were recruited from an outer London acute mental health hospital. They were required to sort 54 statements regarding personal recovery from most important to least important to reflect their recovery priorities. Thirty-six were included in the final analysis. Results: Analysis revealed four distinct viewpoints relating to factors that promote recovery in the acute mental health in-patient setting. These were: stability, independence and ‘keeping a roof over your head’; hope, optimism and enhancing well-being; personal change, self-management and social support; and symptom reduction through mental health support. Conclusions: Acute mental health in-patient wards need to ensure that they are considering the personal recovery needs of in-patients. Symptom reduction was valued by some, but broad psychosocial factors were also of priority.

Catherine Douglas <cat.douglas@swlstg.nhs.uk> is in the School of Health and Social Care, University of Essex, Colchester, UK; and Merton Primary Care Recovery Service, The Wilson Hospital, London, UK.

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