Healy-Cullen, Siobhán, Joanne E. Taylor, Tracy Morison, & Kirsty Ross (2021, March). Using Q-methodology to explore stakeholder views about porn literacy education. Sexuality Research and Social Policy. (ePub in advance of print) (Link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13178-021-00570-1)

Abstract: Introduction. ‘Porn literacy education’ is emerging as a pedagogical strategy to support youth in navigating the new technological pornography landscape. However, the characteristics of effective porn literacy education according to those who will be most affected by it—young people, their caregivers and educators—is unknown. Yet, end user views are imperative to policy development in sexuality education worldwide. Methods. Using Q-methodology, the commonalities and idiosyncrasies of these stakeholder views were explored. In 2019, 30 participants recruited through nine schools in New Zealand completed an online Q sort, and 24 also took part in a follow-up interview. Results. There were two distinct discourses regarding porn literacy education among stakeholders: (i) the pragmatic response discourse and (ii) the harm mitigation discourse. Conclusions. Stakeholders hold nuanced and ideologically charged perspectives about porn literacy education and educational initiatives more generally. It is therefore important that policy caters for these different perspectives and that a ‘one-size-fits-all’ policy approach is acknowledged as insufficient. Policy Implications. It is crucial that policy development is guided by evidence about what constitutes effective sexuality education. The social discourses reported here are important to consider in developing policy about porn literacy education and require further research to more fully understand the potential of porn literacy as pedagogy.

Siobhán Healy-Cullen <siobhanhcullen@gmail.com> is in the School of Psychology, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

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